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20121112
20121112
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
their 2012 victory, in fact, a historical election for them. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has more on the veterans ready to take their seat in congress. >> reporter: republican tom cotton a veteran of iraq and afghanistan was one of the big winners tuesday. seizing the fourth congressional district seat in arkansas. >> i don't know what committeely be assigned to ultimately, but i want to play a central role in helping to guide america's foreign policy in the next congress. >> reporter: cotton a grad school graduate was in the 101st airborne division. nine veterans of these wars have won congressional seats, seven republicans and two democrats. >> this is definitely a historical election for the iraq and afghanistan veterans. there will be more in the next congress, twice as many in the next congress as there are currently. >> reporter: seth lynn has a program training vet verans running for office. he says that iraq and afghanistan veterans may finally have found their political voice. >> i think that a lot of people have come home really established themselves in their commu
said about this. he's a very respected figure, a former counsel to the pentagon, a former assistant attorney general. and he said, basically, assuming the news reports are right, the fbi might have had a duty to report its month-along investigation, related to security breaches, concerning the cia director, quite a while ago. the fbi investigation might have been primarily a law enforcement matter, until very recently, and thus not subject to reporting requirements. though it seems like any investigation into security breaches of the cia director's computer system or communications by definition implicates counterintelligence. david, i want to go back to you. you're speaking about how it goes up the chain of command within the intelligence bureaus. but a separate question, under the law, if we're serious about the law, and the fbi is supposed to be, there's a separate question over, as soon as this moves from being a criminal harassment investigation to an intelligence one, whether senator feinstein and others, as they've said, should have been informed. >> well, i think, clearly, t
, but the pentagon faces potentially critical budget cuts as congress prepares to take on deficit reduction in the fiscal cliff negotiations. retired u.s. army colonel jack jacobs is an msnbc contributor and recipient of the medal of honor for his service in vietnam. it's a great honor to have you here. >> thank you. >> despite resigning, the plot keep thinkckening. >> there will continue to be disclowe schurs about what the affair was all about and how it was discovered and what role the fbi played and what role the white house played and the possibility of delaying the announcement. there will be plenty of speculation, but in terms of an effect on the cia, on the mission, i don't think it will have any affect whatsoever. it's a large organization with lots of missions. the man who is currently the acting director and very, very able. eventually he will be replaced and there will be somebody who will be nominated to take his place and petraeus' place, but the cia will carry on doing what it needs to do and being part of the overall intelligence apparatus of the american government. >> sure
in spending over the next ten years for the pentagon? what's a reasonable part of the deal for na? >> i think a reasonable one is actually about the amount in the sequestration. that's a little bit less than what the boles-simpson commission had. they had about $750 billion. if you take a salmi slice cut like the sequestration bill does, you will harm the military. if you're able to say, wait a moment, maybe we don't need quite as many submarines and we need a sensor system and you can change how we are to the systems we're procuring, then you're able to do this decrease in spending if you put it in the right capability. that's the enormous change that we have to have in our military. look, the navy dpom natuominate commons of the seas and the air force dominates the commons of the air. we have to dominate the commons of cyberspace. look what we did to iran. when we take down centrifuges that enrich the terrain yum. by one virus we stymied them for a while. imagine if we read everything out there and the other side knows that we can do that kind of damage. that is what is very difficult to br
on that night. general joseph dunford is stepping down at the marine corps's second in command. the pentagon calls both moves routine successions. also the navy has replaced charles gauuette due to recent allegations of, quote, inappropriate leadership judgment not otherwise described. there's been some tension between the state department, the cia and the pentagon in recent weeks as they've worked in the words of one official to sync up their benghazi time lines. thursday the closed door hearing intelligence officials will show senators benghazi's surveillance video with a timeline for the first time. >> sharyl, thanks. retired general richard myers is cbs news' military security analyst and former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. good morning. >> good morning, charlie. >> general myers, general petraeus served under you. you know this man well. should he have resigned? is this the kind of thing that a military man should resign who is no longer serving the military, but at the cia? >> certainly if he were still in the military, yes, he should have resigned. i think anybody in charge
to a higher accounting. he has to bring it out. the pentagon will do that as well. the cia, the fbi, the president, all making sure that this is not swept under the carpet here. john, i do not know. when i saw him, these men are away for a long time. my stepfather was in the military. my first husband had a silver star in vietnam. i know what it is like for men and women to be separated. i feel sorry for holly and her family, but at the same time these men, they are not robots. host: diane, thank you for the call this morning. here is the editorial from "the wall street journal." it notes that "if the leaks are correct, the fbi was investigating him for months." host: edward, independent line, thank you for calling. caller: thank you for taking my call. i feel the general is an honorable man who made a mistake. we're all human and we all make errors. most politicians would not do that. that being said, i would like to make a comment about this benghazi thing. republicans have made such a big deal out of it. ronald reagan sent over 200 marines to their death and there was no public o
pentagon correspondent, in which she stocked to petraeus' spokesman while he was in iraq and the question was how is holly doing and the answer was furious would be an understatement. >>> joining us, our senior political analyst, david gergen. he's known both general petraeus and paula broadwell for several year, has communicated with both of them electronically since the scandal broke. also joining us, howard kurtz, the host of "reliable sources" also the washington bureau chief for "newsweek" and "the daily beast." first of all, david gergen, let me go to you. you've communicated with general petraeus, with paula broadwell. what are they saying? how are they doing? what do they have to relate? >> well, the communication had been private, wolf, and i had sent them notes of support when this news first broke because i have known both of them for a long time. i know him better than i know paula, but i just think the world of him. he's been one of the finest leaders of his generation, warrior scholar, has done great service for this country. i was just -- this is so painful for him and for
department, the cia and the pentagon in recent weeks as they work in the words of one official to sync up their bengazhi timeline. thursday the closed door hearing intelligence officials will show a benghazi timeline. >> senior correspondent john miller former assistant director of national against is with us along with retired general richard myers. he's a former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. good morning. general myers, general petraeus served under you, you know this man well. should he have resigned? is this the kind of thing that a military man should resign who is no longer serving the military but at cia. >> if you were in the military yes he should have resign. anybody that's in charge of our secrets like general petraeus was, there are a lot of folks under him that take polygraphs that try to get at are you having affairs, are you vulnerable to outside forces that could force to you leak classified information. he heads the biggest intelligence agency we have in that regard, at least the most sensitive intelligence and i think it's perfectly roper he resign. >> your surp
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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